Volume 2000
Positive, Moral, and Ethical Dimensions of Socio-Economics
AALS Section on Socio-Economics
Annual Meeting Program 
Thursday, January 6, 2000 	
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
	The Section on Socio-Economics was founded to advance socio-economics as a rigorous, positive, value-conscious approach
to economic behavior, predicated on a consideration of whole human beings within social and natural context.  Because socio-
economics is a multi-disciplinary approach not especially beholden to any one school of economics or academic discipline, many of
the Section members accept the view that the codes and rules of professional responsibility require a socio-economic approach to
economic issues and that this approach should be reflected in law teaching.  With the socio-economic approach, lawyers and teachers
will be better able to help clients, students, and others identify and secure their essential rights and responsibilities.
	Following four well-attended annual meeting programs [(1) "Socio-Economics:  What Is Its Place in Law Teaching and Legal
Research?,"  (2) "Socio-Economics and Communitarianism Compared,"  (3) "Paradigms of Economic Thought," and (4) "The Socio-
Economic Alternative in Teaching" ],  the AALS Section on Socio-Economics is celebrating its fifth year and its new status as
a permanent Section by presenting a day-long program to explore in greater depth the relationship of law to economics and other
disciplines by focusing on "The Positive, Moral, and Ethical Dimensions of Socio-Economics."  
	One unifying theme of the program is to explore the responsibilities of lawyers and law teachers when using economics and
other disciplines to serve clients, research legal issues, and teach students.   This theme raises positive and normative issues that are
explored in a number of areas including "professional responsibility,"  "corporate law and responsibility," "law and economics,"
"wealth concentration,"  "environmental law,"  "democratizing monetary policy," "neoclassical economics and the mythology of
deregulation," "democratizing corporate finance with binary economics,"  "feminism, economics, and socio-economics," and "health
care,  fiduciary duties, and patients' rights."
	The 2000 Annual Meeting program featured no fewer than twelve economists, a former U.S. Senator, and a minister who
shares Dr. Martin Luther King's  approach to economics, race and justice, and many other experts in the subjects mentioned above.
The program is intended not only for specialists, but also for generalists interested in improving legal education.
 8:30 a.m.  - 9:15 a.m.		Overview of Socio-Economics and Its Relation to Law 
					Robert Ashford (Syracuse University),  Richard Hattwick (Economics, Western Illinois,
					Editor, Journal of Socio-Economics), Jeffrey Harrison (Florida), Allan Schmid
					(Agricultural Economics, Michigan State), Robert Solo (Economics, Michigan State,
					Emeritus), and Thomas Ulen (Illinois)
 9:30 a.m.  - 11:00 a.m.	Concurrent Sessions: 
				The Moral Dimensions of Economic Behavior  
					Anthony Cook (Georgetown), Amitai Etzioni (University Professor, George
					Washington), Edward N. Wolff (Economics, New York University),  Rev. Dr. Virgil
					Wood (a co-worker with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Pond Street Baptist
					Church, Providence, Rhode Island)
				Perspectives on Corporate Law and Responsibility
					Margaret Blair (Economics, The Brookings Institution), Mark Lutz, (Economics, Maine),
					Lee Preston (School of Business, University of Maryland), 
				Socio-Economic Perspectives on Environmental Regulation
					Nicholas A. Ashford (Law and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
					David Driesen (Syracuse University) 
11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 		Luncheon Speaker:  Rev. Dr. Virgil Wood - "The Beloved Economy"
					(a co-worker with Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.)
12:30 p.m. -   2:00 p.m.		Concurrent Sessions:  
				Socio-Economics and Professional Responsibility
					Sherman Cohn (Georgetown), Monroe Freedman (Hofstra), Peter Kostant (Roger Williams) 
					Amy  Mashburn (Florida), Tom Morgan (Brigham Young), Paul Rothstein (Georgetown)
				Democratizing Corporate Finance With Binary Economics
					U.S. Senator Mike Gravel (Alaska 1969-1981),  William Greider ( National Affairs
					Editor,  Rolling Stone Magazine), Richard Hattwick (Economics, Western Illinois,
					Editor, Journal of Socio-Economics),  John Jones (The Macken Group), Donald Kemner
					(Philadelphia II),  Rodney Shakespeare (Author, London, U.K.), Robert Solo
					(Economics, Michigan State), Virgil Wood, (a co-worker with the Rev. Dr. Martin
					Luther King, Jr., Pond Street Baptist Church, Providence, Rhode Island)
				Feminism, Economics, and Socio-Economics
					Terry O'Neill (Tulane), Kim Gandy (Executive Vice President, National Organization
					of Women), Margaret Oppenheimer (Department of Economics, DePaul University)
2:15 p.m. -   3:45 p.m.		Concurrent Sessions:  
				Democratizing Monetary Policy in a Socio-Economic Way  
					Robert Ashford (Syracuse), U.S. Senator Mike Gravel (Alaska 1969-1981), William
					Greider (National Affairs Editor, Rolling Stone Magazine), Stephen Kane (Kane &
					Associates, Foxboro, Massachusetts),   A. Allan Schmid (Agricultural Economics,
					Michigan State), Robert Solo (Economics, Michigan State)
				Socio-Economic Perspectives on Health Care, Fiduciary Duties, and Patients' Rights
					Barbara Comerford, Esq.  (New Jersey), John V. Jacobi  (Seton Hall), 
					Michael S. Jacobs (DePaul)
				Neoclassical Economics and the Mythology of Deregulation
					Thomas Gorak  (Attorney, Washington D.C.),   Jeffrey L. Harrison (Florida),  Robert
					Loube, Senior Economist (Federal Communications Commission),   Edward L. Rubin
					(Pennsylvania), David Penn (Deputy Executive Director, American Public Power
					Association), Harry Trebing (Economics, Michigan State), Paul Verkuil (Cardozo)
 4:00 p.m. -   5:00 p.m.	Is Socio-Economics a New Approach? - Critique and Commentary
					David Anderson (George Washington), Amitai Etzioni (George Washington),  U.S.
					Senator Mike Gravel (Alaska 1969-1981), William Greider (National Affairs Editor,
					Rolling Stone Magazine), Richard Hattwick (Economics, Western Illinois University,
					Editor, Journal of Socio-Economics)  Mark Lutz (Economics, Maine),   Robert A. Solo
					(Economics, Michigan State, Emeritus),  Harry  M. Trebing, (Economics, Michigan
					State)
Georgetown Conference on Socio-Economics
Wednesday, January 5, 2000
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
	"The Future of Socio-Economics" and other topics were explored in a day-long conference on socio-economics at Georgetown
University Law Center, on January 5, 2000, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m..   The conference was sponsored by members of the AALS
Section on Socio-Economics, and members of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (SASE), and was facilitated with
the generous assistance and hospitality of the Georgetown Law Center.  Special thanks to Robert Ashford and Anthony Cook for
making  organizing this conference.
 9:00 a.m. -  9:30 a.m. 		Overview of Socio-Economics    
				Robert Ashford (Syracuse), Jeffrey Harrison (Florida), Richard Hattwick (Economics, Western Illinois, Editor of the Journal of Socio-Economics)
 9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.		The Future of Socio-Economics: General Plenary Discussion
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.		Concurrent Sessions:
	1.	The Future of Socio-Economics (continued)
	2.	Creating Bibliographies, Course Segments, Courses, Programs and Departments
			Richard Hattwick, A. Allan Schmid (Agricultural Economics, Michigan State), Robert Solo (Economics,
			Michigan State, Emeritus), Tom Ulen (Illinois), Jeffrey Harrison), Edward L. Rubin (Pennsylvania)
	3.	Roundtable of Economics-Focused Organizations    
12:00 noon -  1:00 p.m.	Luncheon Speaker:	William Galston (School of Public Affairs, University of Maryland, 
						Co-Founder of the Communitarian Network) 
  1:15 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.		Multiple concurrent afternoon sessions (from one to two and one half hours in length):	
 	 1.	Socio-Economic Perspectives on Corporate Law and Responsibility: 
			William Bratton (George Washington), James Cox (Duke), Lynne Dallas (San Diego), Kent Greenfield
			(Boston College), Lyman Johnson (Washington and Lee), Faith Kahn (New York), Peter Kostant (Roger
			Williams), Donald C. Langevoort (Georgetown),  David Millon (Washington and Lee),  Larry Mitchell
			(George Washington), Charles O'Kelley (Georgia), Lee Preston (Economics, University of Maryland),
			Lynn Stout (Georgetown), Margaret Sachs (Georgia), Robert Thompson (Washington University), Cynthia
			Williams (Illinois) 
	 2	Uniting Socio-Economics with Communitarianism in a Positive Way   
			David Anderson (George Washington), Anthony Cook (Georgetown),  Richard Hattwick (Western Illinois),
			Mark Lutz (Maine), Virgil Wood (Pond Street Baptist Church, Providence Rhode Island)
	 3.	Socio-Economics and  Professional Responsibility
			Michael P. Ambrosio (Seton Hall), Sherman L. Cohn (Georgetown), Monroe Freedman (Hofstra), Amy
			Mashburn (Florida), Paul Rothstein (Georgetown) 
	 4	Socio-Economics and Democracy:     (1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.)
			U.S. Senator Mike Gravel, Donald Kemner (Philadelphia II), Edward L. Rubin (Pennsylvania)
	 5.	Wealth Concentration and Monetary Policy in Market Economies:   Consequences, Responsibilities, and Solutions:
 			Timothy Canova (University of New Mexico), U.S. Senator Mike Gravel, John Jones (Macken Financial
			Group),William Greider (National Affairs Editor, Rolling Stone Magazine).  Stephen Kane, (Kane &
			Associates),  A. Allan Schmid (Agricultural Economics, Michigan State), Rodney Shakespeare (London),
			Robert Solo  (Economics, Michigan State),  Edward N. Wolff  (Economics, New York University) 
	 6.	Feminism, Economics, and Socio-Economics 
			Terry O'Neill (Tulane),  Margaret Oppenheimer (Economics, DePaul)
	 7. 	Socio-Economic Perspectives on Health Care, Fiduciary Duties, and Patients' Rights
			Barbara Comerford, Esq.  (Attorney, New Jersey), John V. Jacobi (Seton Hall), Michael S. Jacobs (DePaul) 
	 8.	Socio-Economic Perspectives on Environmental Regulation
			Nicholas A. Ashford (Law and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology),
			David Driesen (Syracuse University), James Salzman (American University)		
 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.   Plenary Discussion